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Maryland Bill Would Outlaw Ransomware, Keep Researchers From Reporting Bugs

Maryland Bill Would Outlaw Ransomware, Keep Researchers From Reporting Bugs

A proposed regulation launched in Maryland’s state senate final week would criminalize the possession of ransomware and different prison actions with a pc. However, CEO of Luta Security Katie Moussouris warns that the present invoice “would prohibit vulnerability disclosure unless the specific systems or data accessed by the helpful security researcher were explicitly authorized ahead of time and would prohibit public disclosure if the reports were ignored.” Ars Technica experiences: The invoice, Senate Bill three, covers plenty of floor already coated by U.S. Federal regulation. But it classifies the mere possession of ransomware as a misdemeanor punishable by as much as 10 years of imprisonment and a high-quality of as much as $10,000. The invoice additionally states (in all capital letters within the draft) that “THIS PARAGRAPH DOES NOT APPLY TO THE USE OF RANSOMWARE FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES.”

Additionally, the invoice would outlaw unauthorized intentional entry or makes an attempt to entry “all or part of a computer network, computer control language, computer, computer software, computer system, computer service, or computer database; or copy, attempt to copy, possess, or attempt to possess the contents of all or part of a computer database accessed.” It additionally would criminalize below Maryland regulation any act supposed to “cause the malfunction or interrupt the operation of all or any part” of a community, the computer systems on it, or their software program and knowledge, or “possess, identify, or attempt to identify a valid access code; or publicize or distribute a valid access code to an unauthorized person.” There are not any analysis exclusions within the invoice for these provisions. “While access or attempted access would be a misdemeanor (punishable by a fine of $1,000, three years of imprisonment, or both), breaching databases would be a felony if damages were determined to be greater than $10,000 — punishable by a sentence of up to 10 years, a fine of $10,000, or both,” the report provides. “The punishments go up if systems belonging to the state government, electric and gas utilities, or public utilities are involved, with up to 10 years of imprisonment and a $25,000 fine if more than $50,000 in damage is done.”

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